Posted in Autism, Doctor Who, Family, Parenting, Political, Uncategorized

Sharks Do Get Cancer

1life11It amazes me how certain myths stick while others don’t.

We used to believe:

  • Sharks don’t get cancer (they do, anyone volunteering to put on their sunscreen?)
  • Bananas grow on trees (no, they’re berries that grow on the world’s largest perennial herb plant).
  • We only have 5 senses.
  • Need 8 glasses of water a day.
  • Ulcers were caused by stress or eating acidy foods. Nope, a nasty bacteria, Helicobacter pylori.
  • Tomatoes are veggies, actually, fruit.
  • Chastity belts were for chastity, actually, puritans wanted people to be Masters of their Domain (yeah, I had a Seinfeld flashback).

1love36

  • Humans use 10% of our brain. My son worried his brain couldn’t hold too much information. I explained his brain is like the TARDIS from Doctor Who (looks like an old blue police box, but inside is unlimited space and astonishing things). Now my son fills his head with as much information as possible.
  • Salted water boils faster.
  • Lemmings run off cliffs to kill themselves, actually they go into the sea to swim to mating area – come on, there’s no one you’d jump and swim for?
  • Poinsettias are poison, no, but why is anyone eating Poinsettias anyway?
  • Milk increases mucus.
  • Shouldn’t swim after you eat.
  • Humans and dinosaurs existed during the same time period (except in Jurassic Park, of course).
  • Dieting myths, endless dieting myths.
  • People with Epilepsy were possessed by demons.
    Just because you believe something doesn’t mean you have to keep believing it.
    Free speech is important, too bad it can also be hurtful or deadly.

The news pumps out stories of measles and other outbreaks; the anti-vaccine and pro-vaccine contingents battle on.
Vaccinated and unvaccinated children get Autism.
Millions get vaccinated and don’t have Autism.
What about genetics? Environmental agents? Epigenetics? Infectious processes? Autoimmume? I don’t know the answer, maybe it’s the Perfect Storm etiology, a predisposition in conjunction with various components.
Or maybe they’re just different or a vanguard of human evolution.

1funny87Calling other parents names and berating them for vaccinating their children isn’t going to find a cause or a cure or help them live good lives. Autism was once known as Childhood Schizophrenia. Now we know better and have broader definitions, better awareness, resources, and statistics.  Jenny McCarthy said her son was a Crystal Child, then had Landau-Kleffner Syndrome (a seizure disorder with symptoms similar to Autism). That didn’t sell, so she jumped on the Autism train and rode it all the way to stardom, sort of. Mass hysteria that would make the Salem Witch Trials blush has swept the world, based on one discredited study. McCarthy has since backed off, having made a fortune, but the damage is done.

The myth has outgrown its origins.

If you want me to believe something, don’t use  insults, anecdotal evidence, anger, flawed logic, catastrophic hyperbole, and endless drama. If your point is valid you could debate or even argue it, in a rational and respectful manner. I also don’t understand having a mock funeral when your child is diagnosed with Autism. If only people could unite to help our children, use all that energy, time, money, and passion to promote tolerance, acceptance, support, love, and hope, imagine how much better the world would be.

If you believe, you don’t have to belittle.

“Just because your voice reaches halfway around the world doesn’t mean you are wiser than when it reached only to the end of the bar.”~Edward R. Murrow

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Very me

52 thoughts on “Sharks Do Get Cancer

  1. I’m afraid that when it comes to the art of having reasonable, respectful discussions about differences in opinions, that ship has sailed.
    Don’t you know that he or she who yells the loudest and is persistent enough to get the last word is ALWAYS right? 😉

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      1. Had we already established this earlier? Sorry. I can’t juggle the way I used to, or believe I did. I always had a feeling we were both in the same hemisphere. Thank YOU for sharing. I might have missed this another time and if so , I apologize. My memory thinks it’s in charge, but without a credit card print-out–are you kidding? o_O

        Liked by 1 person

  2. I wish you could see me as I read this post – I stood and started to do the “profound movie moment” clap. This scientist says “Thank you. Well said, well put.” (it still amazes me that Jenny McCarthy pretty much single-handedly set public health back a whole generation).

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The vitriol is unbelievable, how can people be that hateful to people they don’t even know, just because they don’t agree. It’s weird. 🙂
      Thank you. 🙂
      Hope this week is treating you kindly so far. 🙂

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  3. I felt really sad when I read of parents holding mock funerals when their child is diagnosed with autism. I understand that it is a severe shock and what with all the appointments etc involved with early intervention, your own life could seem over but it doesn’t seem to respect the love you feel for your child or honour your child at all.
    This may seem like an odd comparison but I love and cherish my dog and I don’t expect him to speak, read, write now he does communicate and interact with me very intimate despite not being able to do these things in a way that a child with severe autism may not but to me it’s all about finding some acceptance and a funeral strikes me as a very negative approach. I have been touched by asbergers in my family and it can be hard when people don’t get my emotional responses and it does hurt but somehow we have to appreciate the whole person and who they are instead. Hope this makes sense. I’m a bit tired. Should be getting the kids off to school but we had a late night with scouts last night and we’re all rather tired. xx Rowena

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    1. Rowena, I understand completely, we should love who we love unconditionally.
      Yes, these mock funerals are negative and cruel toward those children and those who have actually lost children.
      Thank you for taking the time to share your wonderful insights, Rowena, especially when you’re busy. 🙂
      Hope this day is treating you and yours kindly. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. It is interesting because I can get a bit pissed off with my auto-immune disease and the things I can’t do or can’t do easily and the foot has been a bit of a nuisance but I spotted a Mum struggling to get her son into school in a wheelchair this morning. All the disabled spots were full and I was in the last one. Instantly, we were able to touch base and connect and understand about all the appointments etc. It was great. If I hadn’t broken my foot, we wouldn’t have met…not that I’m happy about the broken foot but it is comforting to see some positive come out of a negative. As for my day…I am off for a midday nap and it’s been a lovely day so far. Hope your day is going well too xx Rowena

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      2. I’m always fascinated by that, the way we find people, the ways we connect.
        Sorry you’re on the outs with your autoimmune system, I get that. Hopefully your foot is better very soon. 🙂
        Take care. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      1. You’re so welcome, Janice, and it’s so true, we need more bloggers helping bloggers. 🙂
        Hope this week is treating you well, can’t wait for tomorrow’s #BloggersPitStop 🙂

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