Posted in Movies, Uncategorized

BRAVE

brave1Merida (Kelly Macdonald) is different from the average Disney Princess. She’s strong, independent, and doesn’t need a man to define her. She’s not stick insect thin, her hair is frizzy, she doesn’t worry about her clothes, she wants to compete, she’s confident, and secure in who she is.

Not that Disney didn’t try to alter Pixar’s vision of Merida. They were going to thin her out, smooth out her hair, and round out her eyes (the better to spot your Prince, I guess).
Thankfully A Mighty Girl http://www.amightygirl.com/, a website dedicated to empowering girls filed a petition with Disney that said keep her as she is – imperfectly perfect.
The world doesn’t need another blatantly sexist marketing depiction of women. Aren’t there more than enough?

This isn’t about feminism because I really don’t consider myself one, this is more about equality in roles, jobs, life, and the future.

I always think of Joss Whedon‘s answer, when asked by a reporter why he writes so many strong female characters. “Because you’re still asking me that question.”  
Says it all.

What is this fascination with encouraging girls and women to be a Princess?

Fine for Halloween or dress up, but why not look for more than an antiquated and archetypal figure whose only role was to marry a Prince and in fairy tales, live happily ever after.

Why not encourage girlbrave2s to be more: a doctor, lawyer, athlete, researcher, scientist, teacher, politician, writer, computer programmer, explorer, photographer, military personnel, activist, dentist, miner, astronaut, police officer, nurse, clerk, accountant, chef, nuclear physicist, CEO, journalist, postal worker, diplomat, Mom, President, Prime Minister, artist, entertainer, etc. Or all of the above?

Why not encourage girls to be something that doesn’t revolve around jewels and gowns?

This movie is rife with themes ranging from communication issues, prejudice, pride, strength, standing up for what you believe in, love, hope, and acceptance.

Watching this you felt there was some chance for cartoons and people to break free of the stereotypes and brainwashing.

But it turns out it’s not a whole new world, and many still prefer for their Fairy Godmother to transform them into a Princess so they can find their Prince.

I just hope they make sure they love who they are and add the Prince, not need him for definition.

Thebrave4 depiction of Scotland in pseudo Medieval times was gorgeous. Funny, silly, but with a lot of great messages.

The cast was fantastic.

Thank you Pixar, for being Brave.

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Author:

Very me

5 thoughts on “BRAVE

  1. BRAVE
    Sounds like a great disney movie. I like that the Princess is “strong, independent
    and doesn’t need a man to cover her”. She’s like what all girls should want to be in
    life.

    Like

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