Posted in Canada, Christmas, Doctor Who, Family, Internet, Movies, Parenting, Televison, Uncategorized

Youth is not wasted on the young

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Maybe childhood wasn’t as warm and fuzzy as we remember, or portrayed in movies and on TV…but it had its moments.

  • Saturday morning meant cartoons – not hours of commercials interspersed with cartoons.

  • At supper, I heard about children starving in various countries. I was more than willing to give them all my peas.

  • Avoiding cracks so you didn’t break your Mom’s back. When my Mom says her back hurts, I get a twinge of guilt.

  • Going downtown was something exciting, not scary.

  • Hide and seek until the street lights came on, running home as fast as possible with a breathless ‘see ya tomorrow’ to your friends.

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  • Early to bed, early to rise, early to appointments, early to parties, early to finish your schoolwork early so you can watch TV. Life had a rhythm, and it was an early rhythm.

  • Christmas was celebrated in a few days, not months.  

  • White bread into tiny balls dipped into corn syrup that came in a bright yellow container shaped like a beehive. And hot dogs were a treat, not evil.

  • 15 minutes to decide on just the right mix of candy to fill that brown paper bag. Important decisions should never be rushed.

  • A Stand By Me journey on the railway tracks to the swimming area with your friends. No dead body, but if the story was told often enough who knew what would show up.childhood10

  • Every minute of your day, evenings, weekends, summers, or holidays weren’t scheduled, planned, full of activities, and the internet. You just hung out with friends or looked for friends to hang out with, rode your bike, read, laughed, did chores, got reminded to do chores, got reminded again to do your chores (I was getting to it), blew dandelions, built a fort, whatever.childhood13

  • Cats just magically followed you home.

  • You could summon Bloody Mary or other spirits by way of mirrors, buckets of water, and Ouija boards. One of us was moving that small heart-shaped piece of wood, right?

  • The stuff we had to say years ago wasn’t as important as stuff now; it could wait until you used a landline, wrote a letter, or talked to someone in person.

  • Waiting for your favourite show. Waiting until a special occasion to have cake. Waiting to talk to your friend. Waiting for a first kiss. Waiting was often the best part of anything. Sounds like a lot of waiting, but it turns out, human beings are often happier with anticipation than they are with the results.

I hope my son remembers his childhood as fondly.

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Author:

Very me

53 thoughts on “Youth is not wasted on the young

    1. I know and I still have a moment when I think of taking a bath and then I hear the Jaws music.
      Yes, that’s a perfect description of reading in bed in the morning, thanks, it made me smile. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  1. I thoroughly enjoyed your post!. Remember dandelion chains, Mad magazine, jaw breakers. Hanging out under a tree on a hot summer day eating ice cream and …doing nothing? Those were the days!

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    1. Thank you. 🙂
      Wow, I’d forgotten about dandelion chains and my jaw is still trying to forget jawbreakers. Loved Mad magazine (what me worry?) and the ice cream love never went away. 🙂
      Thank you for the memories. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Unfortunately we didn’t really know exactly how wonderful those times were until we got much older.
    I love the last line. I hope my sons remember their childhood fondly too ❤

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  3. It would appear that you and I had very similar childhoods, except sharks still terrify me. If anything, my irrational fear has only gotten worse. I do hope my kids have equally fond memories.

    Like

    1. I know, but I rarely think of sharks in pools or bathtubs, except if I’m at a pool and I see a shadow or flash of light and just for a second I think, shark! lol
      Hope this day treats you and yours kindly.:)

      Like

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