Posted in Books, Jane Austen, Uncategorized

Everybody Hurts…Sometimes

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I read my way through my town’s library as a child and many others since. My reading could be best described as voracious and eclectic, but my favourite reading palate cleanser is still romance novels, even more so when I’m ill and want something lovely to think about other than being ill. Perhaps I’m trying to find romance or love without the pain that comes with it. This may need deeper analysis, or none at all.

Some romances are taken seriously, others aren’t, when really, all romances are about the same things: finding love, losing love, fear of losing love, hope of finding love…what’s the pattern here? Love.1darcy8

What’s the difference between a classic romance
and ‘trashy’ romance novels?
Jane Eyre, Northanger Abbey,
Anna Karenina, Persuasion,
Outlander, Wuthering Heights,
Breakfast at Tiffany’s, Stardust,
The Notebook, Mansfield Park,
The Tale of Genji, Doctor Zhivago,
A Room with a View,
Sense and Sensibility,
Romance of the Forest,
Gone With The Wind,
North and South,
Pride and Prejudice, versus1diana1
A Rogue By Any Other Name,
Invincible, Stormy Persuasion,
Hard to Handle, The Pirate Lord,
Much Ado About You, Protector,
Pride and Pleasure, Love Overdue,
Wyoming Strong, I Adored A Lord,
Texas Born, A Scandal to Remember,
The Cowboy and the Lady,
How to Romance a Rake,
Noble Intentions,
Reforming A Rake,  
A Seduction at Christmas, which I have to assume involves wrapping paper…

 I guess the differences are: timing, marketing, perception, bias, and maybe luck. Fabio covers aside, the industry has changed. Romance sells and continues to evolve: Historical, Contemporary, Regency, Gothic, Erotica, Paranormal, Steampunk, Fantasy, Suspense, Mystery, Futuristic…the sky’s the limit. 1love28

Diana Palmer (aka Susan Kyle) is a prolific romance writer who weaves delightful stories of love, but her books are actually more about: history, law enforcement, murder, mercenaries, gaming, the environment, social values, and a whole passel of cowboys.1diana3
1diana6When I was reading Ms. Palmer’s latest books, Invincible and Wyoming Strong (HQN), borrowed courtesy of Netgalley.com for the great price of an honest review, I was reminded again how this ex-journalist can skilfully compose not only remarkable characters, but stories that entertain and enlighten.
1diana5A little melodramatic, sure, but isn’t that the point? The drama, suspense, tension, wondering whether the hero and heroine will get together in the end? It would be a boring if they met, fell in love and lived happily ever after. There needs to be conflict and obstacles so the main characters change and grow throughout the story.

Palmer is exceptional at crafting deeply flawed, but wonderful characters. Not perfect people whose eyes meet across a crowded room; they’ve survived trauma and hardship and have found that love isn’t always perfect, or convenient, or easy, but it doesn’t mean it can’t be wonderful. They’re damaged in various ways, as R.E.M. famously crooned, Everybody Hurts Sometimes, but life doesn’t stop and neither does love…On a plane, on a train, in a boat, in the rain…In a house, with a louse. In a tree? Let it be. Aliens invaded, or your looks have faded. Mind scarred by trauma, life full of drama. Surrounded by the undead, or your children waiting to be fed. Your heart has Humpty Dumpty shattered, like it never really mattered. Yet you may find love here or there, you may find love anywhere.
The point, whatever you read or whomever you love, tolerance might be the key to saving us all; it’s fairly clear intolerance is doing us in.

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Author:

Very me

14 thoughts on “Everybody Hurts…Sometimes

  1. I was going to say I didn’t like romantic novels, but having read through your list I am passionate about ‘Gone With The Wind’ (I’ve just bought the video) and ‘Wuthering Heights’, and my current book, (not finished yet) ‘Where Lies My Heart) although it is predominantly an action story, has romance/sex in it.

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